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Please suggest Books for PL/SQL

Discussion in 'SQL PL/SQL' started by billy19murahmi, Sep 2, 2012.

  1. billy19murahmi

    billy19murahmi Active Member

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    Hi ,

    I'm new to PL/SQL, i am very much interested to learn it.
    Could you please suggest me some good books for PL/SQL and SQL which i can buy online.
    I wanna get some in depth knowledge on PL/SQL and SQL.
    so please help me by suggesting good books.

    Note: i already tried learning from oracle site, and other online sites but i prefer hard copy. That's why i am looking for a book.

    Thank you,

    Billy
     
  2. dariyoosh

    dariyoosh Forum Advisor

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    Hello there,


    The question of choosing a book is to some extent a matter of taste as all people may not find the same book interesting and clear. So what I'm going to suggest is nothing but example of books among many others that personnally I prefer.


    (currently I'm reading this one and seems to be very complete and informative)
    http://www.amazon.com/Oracle-PL-SQL...&qid=1346657426&sr=1-1&keywords=oracle+PL+SQL


    (personally I haven't read it but I found the link on the asktom web site who attests for its completeness and accuracy, so if Tom says it's good
    I tend to believe that is good as believe what Tom says :).
    http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1590592174


    (read several chapters, it is clear but comparing to the first one it is written rather like a reference, but again with clear examples)
    http://www.amazon.com/Oracle-Databa...&qid=1346657426&sr=1-2&keywords=oracle+PL+SQL


    And of course, without any doubt the defintive source is oracle online PL/SQL Reference where you find many important technical details
    and subtleties which are sometimes omitted in books. So for starting to learn, you take a book but once become familiar with the stuff you may go towards oracle PL/SQL documentation which
    is the official worldwide source of information.


    Kind Regards,
    Dariyoosh
     
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  3. dariyoosh

    dariyoosh Forum Advisor

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  4. bharadwaja.nanduri

    bharadwaja.nanduri Active Member

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    Hi Billy.
    Check the attached document.It was too good.I am following the same material" BEST SQL_PLSQL material.pdf ".:hurray

    Regards
    Bharath.
     

    Attached Files:

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  5. billy19murahmi

    billy19murahmi Active Member

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    Hi dariyoosh,

    Thanks for your awesome suggestions.
    i'm gonna buy Oracle PL/SQL Programming: Covers Versions Through Oracle Database 11g Release 2 and Oracle Database 11g SQL.
    These both seems like very good books ( read the reviews ), hope to learn something which i can treasure.
    Thanks for your help again.

    hi Bharath,
    Thanks for the pdf, let me check that out as well.

    - billy
     
  6. jamuna_j

    jamuna_j Active Member

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    @billy19murahmi
    'Oracle PL/SQL Programming' is a great choice. It is written by one of the Oracle gurus in the industry. You may buy it as a guide for your learning.

    But if you are a beginner looking for practical hands-on, it may not be wise to start your learning process from this book. Oracle PL/SQL Programming is huge, and too thorough for a beginner. You may get it and use it for gradual learning, but not like a crash course.

    As you are new, my suggestion would be learn to write the basic program units like procedures, functions, packages etc from online tutorials, look for example coding and learn how a PL/SQL program flows. Then try some simple exercises by yourself.
    Once you are comfortable with simple coding, then you can refer the book to learn more advanced concepts and improving your coding practices. You will be more confident learning concepts and theories if you have some basic coding practice.
     
  7. zargon

    zargon Community Moderator Forum Guru

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    Steven Feuerstein's text is an excellent resource for beginner or experienced PL/SQL programmer. Basic concepts are covered as well as advanced topics; do not be afraid to use this text to learn the basics as well as advanced subject matter as your skills improve. The temptation is to skip ahead, which I would not do as it could only create confusion until basic concepts are grasped.

    In my opinion it IS wise to use this from the beginning; read carefully and thoroughly the first few chapters until the concepts are clear and you can write PL/SQL blocks and program units without referencing the text. At that point move on to the later chapters.
     
  8. jamuna_j

    jamuna_j Active Member

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    yes it must be read carefully and thoroughly which was my point. beginners who may want to dive right in may not be as patient to learn all the concepts - quick online tutorials are better suited for them. of course it all depends on how they approach their learning a new programming language
     
  9. zargon

    zargon Community Moderator Forum Guru

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    I disagree; you do a great disservice to beginners with that statement. Those who tend to 'dive right in' are attempting to solve a specific problem without understanding the basics; I don't find many who are that single-minded. I have been helping those who want to learn Oracle/SQL*Plus/PL/SQL for over 16 years and I have yet to see an earnest beginner so focused on solving a single problem that they fail to learn the basics. Those that have attempted to bypass the foundation material soon found themselves lost and unable to go beyond the rote assistance lesser experienced people provided. You can sit at the pool all summer and watch people swimming but you won't be successful at actually swimming until you learn the basics; 99% of the beginners, I believe, know this. The other 1% are happy, initially, using other people's scripts -- scripts they can't explain -- to make it look like they do know something until someone asks 'what is that script doing?', and they cannot provide an answer. This iswhat I've found over the years.

    Sweeping generalizations usually do no one any good.
     
  10. jamuna_j

    jamuna_j Active Member

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    Oh! I'm sorry. You might have misunderstood my intentions with that answer :).

    I do not for a moment suggest that those who learn SQL, PL/SQL by quick short-cut methods are right in doing that, or that all beginners will want to 'dive right in' without learning basics. If you read my reply carefully you will see that I did not generalize beginners in any way.
    I myself like to learn stuff with strong foundations. I agree that people who learn in quick ways, without getting a hold on the basics, find themselves lost in the long run. If a newbie were to come up to me and ask for my advice on learning Oracle - I myself would strongly suggest they read through all the basics first.

    I only acknowledged that some learners are there - who would prefer learning quickly - and there are ways for them. I never said that by learning that way they would become good in Oracle - they won't!
    If, however, that's what they are looking for, online tutorials are good enough. If they are serious about learning all the concepts well and getting into programming, Steve Feuerstein's book is one of the best offline resources. Making people aware of the different options does not mean I endorse all of them :).

    I hold the same views about learning as you do, my reply was just an innocent suggestion for the breed of people who may want to learn it like a crash course, it was not an endorsement or advice that everybody should learn that way! I hope you can see the difference... I'm sorry if it gave the wrong impression.. :)