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Learning about oracle database

Discussion in 'SQL PL/SQL' started by dbnewbie132, Jun 2, 2016.

  1. dbnewbie132

    dbnewbie132 Starter

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    Hi there,

    As someone who is relatively new to the world of Oracle databases I would love to get up to speed quicker. Please PM me if you are available for a very basic 1 hour phone call (for which I will pay $125). I am trying to learn more about Oracle DB from the perspective of a DB admin, someone who has worked at Oracle, or someone who has understanding of various DB architectures. Please PM me.

    Sincerely,
    DBN
     
  2. zargon

    zargon Community Moderator Forum Guru

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    What is it you want to learn that isn't out on the internet somewhere? The Oracle online documentation is an excellent place to visit to answer many of your questions, and there are various blogs by respected Oracle DBAs that can provide such a perspective.

    It isn't a common practice (nor is it recommended) that money be offered for such information and private calls aren't the norm here. Please provide more detail on what it is, exactly, that you are looking for.
     
  3. dbnewbie132

    dbnewbie132 Starter

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    Thanks zargon. I have read many of these blogs and visited a lot of the online resources. A lot of them are overly technical for me to begin with. I am trying to understand very basic things such as how people choose a DB or an OS to begin with, why RDBMS vs. NoSQL, etc. I apologize if this is the wrong venue.
     
  4. raovk13

    raovk13 Premium Member

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    Attaching a file..hope it helps.

    Regards,
    Krishna rao
     

    Attached Files:

  5. zargon

    zargon Community Moderator Forum Guru

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    You're asking about business decisions, not about Oracle specifically. O/S choices may be dependent on several things:

    Experience of the administration team
    Cost
    Interoperability with existing systems
    What will be run on the given O/S

    Windows, Linux, UNIX, MacOS ... the choices are many and usually are reduced by the talent pool in a given company. If a company has Windows as its primary operating system it's not likely they would change to Linux or UNIX as the learning curve may be too steep for the existing admins to tackle. If a company uses Linux or UNIX as an operating system it's probably because any software/database choices run best on that O/S. Oracle runs on Windows, not quite as well as it does on UNIX/Linux, but I know of companies who use Oracle and run Windows exclusively. It's their choice to make.

    An RDBMS is usually selected for the features and functionality it provides; the O/S may be a secondary choice based on which RDBMS will be in use. MySQL, Oracle, NoSQL, SQL Server, Postgres ... those choices are also varied and may depend as much on ease-of-use as they do on features/functionality. What the enterprise will DO with the database engine also has a strong influence on which database to use. "Big Data" isn't usually suited to a relational DBMS; structured data, with referential integrity, is. It may be a management decision rather than a choice based on preference. The lowest cost to implement and operate is a large influence on what technology a company will use; the lowest overall cost, short-term and long-term, wins.

    Talking to one person about this will likely be misleading as you'll get one perspective; to answer the general questions you pose you need a number of varying opinions to cover the needs and wants of several areas of the marketplace. There is no one universal decision on O/S or database as every enterprise, every sector of the market, is different. You could go broke finally getting the broad answer your inquiries generate.
     
  6. dbnewbie132

    dbnewbie132 Starter

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    That is very helpful. Thank you for that. I will continue my investigation with this in mind. Thanks zargon.
     
  7. dbnewbie132

    dbnewbie132 Starter

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    Thank you Krishna. This is great.